Last year I bought a house that had the stainless steel micro model installed. The house was surrounded by 80’ tall Maples & Birch. TONS OF LEAVES.Yes, it the micro mesh keeps all leaf and seeds out of the gutter 100%. What the manf and dealers won’t tell you is that you must clean the mesh 2x’s a year to get spring pollen, mold, & fall leaf dust off. Otherwise it will eventually keep EVERYTHING out, including WATER. Major ice problems flowing over the gutters. No it was not the result of ice damming. I removed it all & just deal with the leaves 3x’s each fall.Got ranch home with easy access to the gutters - get the micro mesh. Easier to clean that than clean gunk out of the gutter.hire a young buck to climb a ladder. A whole lot cheaper.
A full bath requires a minimum of 36 to 40 sq. ft. The finished room must measure at least 5 ft. in one direction to accommodate a tub. Building codes typically require 32x32 in. (finished dimensions) for a shower; if you have the space, larger is better. Just make sure the shower is large enough so you can comfortably raise your arms and bend over in the space.
Adequate lighting is needed for all forms of grooming. Include task-specific and ambient, or general, light. Multiple recessed ceiling fixtures are all but invisible and eliminate the locker-room look of a single ceiling-mounted fixture. Include a light fixture above the tub and/or in the shower. Avoid fluorescent lights, which alter the color of your complexion.
Determine how much you can afford to spend on your remodel to determine the extent of the changes you can make. If your budget is on the low end (i.e. $1,000 or less), you’ll want to stick to cosmetic changes, such as new fixtures or a new sink, and new paint. If you have more to spend, you can focus on larger changes, such as adding tile, a bigger shower, or a window. Again, it all depends on your budget.
Given the complexity of bathrooms—multiple components in a compact space, not to mention all that water—doing the project right is a challenge. (See Remodeling Dos and Don'ts.) On a cost-per-square-foot basis, bathrooms are one of the most expensive spaces to remodel. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend a fortune. That’s where Consumer Reports’ Bathroom Remodeling Guide comes in. Our product testers have spent months rating the latest toilets, sinks, countertops, and other bathroom essentials to separate the winners from the also-rans. We’ve also interviewed designers, contractors, and real estate pros nationwide to find out what to include—and what to skip—on your bathroom-remodel wish list.  
The average bathroom remodel costs $10,436 Most homeowners spend between $5,968 and $14,905. You can spend as little as $3,500 to $7,000 updating the essentials in a small or medium-sized bathroom. On a large or master bath, you could spend $25,000 or more. Labor averages 50 percent of the total project price at about $65 per hour. Expect pricing to vary regionally up to 20 percent due mainly to labor. Material prices stay roughly the same across the country.
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