Just wondering. In the polybutylene story the Ask This Old House trailer is sitting in the driveway of the home in Virginia. Richard is there to emcee but a local company is hired to do the work, so Richard needs no tools. Does someone tow the empty trailer to these distant sites just to use it in the exterior shots? Or, do they haul the lighting and cameras and such cross country in it? Or, do they rent a trailer locally and just temporarily apply an AskTOH wrap for the cameras?
Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.

Another often overlooked, yet important detail, is grout and caulk. When this gets grimy, it gets unsightly. By simply cleaning the grout and adding straight, clean lines of caulk around the tub and sink, you can add sparkle for a mere few dollars. You might be surprised at what a difference this can make! Grout and caulk are both cheap, so this is a very inexpensive way to freshen up your bathroom.


Like any other bathroom, you also have to consider the floor and wall design. If you plan to have a solid wall as part of your walk in shower, use a neutral tile color that maintains the airiness of the bathroom. One area where you can create a unique style is the back wall, which you can use as the focus of your walk in shower and bathroom as a whole. For instance, a nice stone mosaic back wall draws your attention to it immediately you set foot into the shower.
Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.
However, let’s say you do have some vintage bathroom fixtures or an old tub you don’t want to get rid of. The good news? You can refinish them yourself if they’re made of porcelain, cast iron, or fiberglass. That said, it takes time and some investment. A basic DIY refinishing kit will run you between $100 and $150, but you’ll also need additional supplies such as a sander, a spray gun, face masks, paint brushes, etc. You can see a good, basic tutorial for DIY refinishing at HGTV.
Right now, one of the biggest trends in bathrooms is also one that budget DIYers can pull off with style. The trend is using old dressers as sink pedestals. You simply cut out the top of the dresser to accommodate a sink insert, cut into or remove interior drawers as necessary, and cut holes in the back for plumbing. These “dresser sinks” can sell for thousands of dollars in retail stores, but you can easily make your own with a budget dresser, some patience, and the right tools.
Are you environmentally conscious? Then this guide will help you turn your bathroom from a non-green disaster to an environmentally friendly haven. Learn how to turn various pieces of your bathroom green, including: toilets, faucets, showerheads, cabinetry, countertops, flooring & tiles, reducing water usage, and other green tips and practices. Learn more here.
There are so many beautiful things to notice about this bathroom that it's hard to know where to start. The concrete sink? The wallpaper? The sconce lighting? The tarnished mirror on the door, reflected in the main mirror? The barely-there ultra-modern faucets? Whatever you notice first, though, you can't but admit that this space is a masterpiece.

One of the first things you’ll want to do before jumping into a bathroom remodel is to develop a budget. Think about how much money you can use for this project, and add an extra 15 to 20 percent in case you have some unexpected expenses. In the world of remodeling, it’s more often the norm rather than the exception to spend a little more money than you have originally planned. Read more simple bathroom remodel ideas.
Focus on durability. The surfaces and fixtures will likely get lots of wear and tear, especially if children use the room. Plastic laminate flooring and countertops are durable and inexpensive, plus the kids likely don’t care if they have high-end materials. As for fixtures, you still want high-quality construction, including all-brass parts and a PVD (physical vapor deposition) finish that resists scratches, but go with basic chrome, rather than pricier nickel or bronze. On the walls, choose an interior paint that resists mildew.
If your would-be sanctuary is a major sore spot, you’re not alone. Bathrooms are second only to the kitchen on people’s wish lists of rooms to remodel, especially since the current economy-induced deferred maintenance has pushed so many past their 20-year lifespan. “At that age, bathrooms really start to get tired,” says Art Donnelly, president of Legacy Design Build in Mount Sinai, New York. “Leaky toilets, grimy grout, loose tiles—you name it, it’s probably an issue.”
How much should you spend on your master bathroom? A rule of thumb is that the total project—including materials and installation—should cost no more than 5 to 10 percent of your home’s value. The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) puts the national average at about $16,000. Another guide is Remodeling Magazine's Cost vs. Value report, which compares the average cost of various renovation projects with the value they retain at resale. In 2011-2012, mid-range bathroom remodels cost an average of $16,552 and recouped 62 percent, while upscale bathroom remodels cost an average of $52,249 and recouped 56 percent. Here’s how the NKBA breaks down the budget for a typical bathroom remodel:                               

A double vanity can look good even in small bathrooms but takes up a lot of space that might be better utilized. If additional storage space is just as important to you as the extra sink is, use upright cabinets as a linen closet for towels and toiletries. Selecting a vanity with drawers or open shelving beneath the sink can create storage solutions.
There are so many beautiful things to notice about this bathroom that it's hard to know where to start. The concrete sink? The wallpaper? The sconce lighting? The tarnished mirror on the door, reflected in the main mirror? The barely-there ultra-modern faucets? Whatever you notice first, though, you can't but admit that this space is a masterpiece.
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